OTR Presents. Giggle.

Buying gifts for kids is tough, especially when they are not yours. For the little ones up to a couple of years old, hit Giggle. They have an amazing selection of toys, clothes, carriers, cribs, feeding/washing apparatuses and just about everything else you can think of for the zero to two’s.If you’re into the tactile shopping experience and in NYC, they have stores in Soho, Upper East and Upper West Sides. If you’re out of the city, there are 10 more locations dotting the country or you can just keep it super easy and shop online.

About the Author |
We earn our living selling New York City. The next day is never like the last. The last is never ordinary. We witness all sorts. We listen to the City’s noise. We devour its phenomenal food. On the Real is our documentary. It is your pack of unfiltered New York 100s.

It’s a mansion!

I was walking down East 62nd Street this morning and was particularly struck by the contrast between the green leaves on the trees and this fantastic Beaux-Arts mansion that I have passed by so many times before.

Turns out 11 East 62nd Street was bought for $21,000,000 in 1999 by the Government of Japan and is used as the home of its permanent representati  ve to the United Nations.  It was built in 1900 by Margaret Vanderbilt Sheperd for her daughter Edith and her husband Ernesto Fabbri who was head of the Society for Italian Immigrants.  Now known as the Fabbri-Steele Mansion, it stands 45 and a half feet wide with 22,500 square feet under roof!  The architects, Haydel & Shepard, drew plans for massive entertaining spaces including the ornate ballroom, 21 by 45 foot mahogany paneled dining room, seven principle bedrooms, as well as nine staff rooms to house the Swedish chefs, English butler and footmen, Finnish lady’s maid, and Italian valet.  Phew!

The second floor music room boasted this ridiculously ornate electro-pneumatic Aeolian Organ which was installed at a reported cost of $7,500.  Apparently, most everything from the unpainted rolling oak doors in the kitchen to the studded leather door to the dining room was intact when the Japanese government bought the house 13 years ago.  The organ was apparently disassembled and placed in storage where it waits restoration. Check out this 1999 Times article for more history and details and this for a little more on the Aeolian organ.

About the Author |
We earn our living selling New York City. The next day is never like the last. The last is never ordinary. We witness all sorts. We listen to the City’s noise. We devour its phenomenal food. On the Real is our documentary. It is your pack of unfiltered New York 100s.