Brooklyn Crab.

The family took me to Brooklyn Crab in Red Hook for Father’s Day, and much fun was had by all. If you haven’t been, here’s a few tips:

1) Although they are open year round, now is obviously when you want to go. They have an extremely enjoyable upper patio that offers stellar views of the wide part of Hudson and refreshingly cool breezes. It’s a sweet setup. They’ll offer you a variety of seating when you arrive, but trust us: what you want is the patio.deck2) Even if you don’t have kids, you may appreciate the miniature golf course they have in the back. It may depend on how much you’ve had to drink, so plan accordingly. There’s also a game there called “Cornhole,” but I don’t know from that. Maybe it’s a New England thing.Red Blue Crab3) Get the blue crabs. In fact, we think it’s sound policy to always get the dish the restaurant is named after. And at Brooklyn Crab, they are certainly kind of pricey but they know what they’re doing with the preparation. Steamed, smothered in Old Bay, corn on the cob, slaw, and a pint of cold Narragansett. Yum.Smash4) Bring a helper along to assist you with smashing the claws. This is without a doubt a two person job.

5) Wet naps. Ask for extras.Munch

About the Author |
We earn our living selling New York City. The next day is never like the last. The last is never ordinary. We witness all sorts. We listen to the City’s noise. We devour its phenomenal food. On the Real is our documentary. It is your pack of unfiltered New York 100s.

Radio On The Real. St. John Frizell.

More often than not, we find that change can be the most profound at the local level. Whether New York City or Laredo, it’s typically the actions of a concerned few who live in and love their towns that define the collective future for that place. This is why we were excited to sit down with St. John Frizell last week. St. John makes a seriously mean cocktail, but he’s also the owner of Red Hook mainstay, Fort Defiance. Aptly named, Fort Defiance began life as a widely enjoyed café/bar/restaurant on Van Brunt Street, but in the devastation following Hurricane Sandy, it became something even bigger…a leader and champion of the Restore Red Hook movement. A fantastic storyteller with a great life story, St. John gets real with us about the restaurant business, why the Third Place matters, and the bright future of Red Hook.

st. john frizell, Craig LaCourt, red hook flicks, fort defiance, red hook

Thanks to portrait photographer Craig LaCourt for the iconic photo of St John!

About the Author |
We earn our living selling New York City. The next day is never like the last. The last is never ordinary. We witness all sorts. We listen to the City’s noise. We devour its phenomenal food. On the Real is our documentary. It is your pack of unfiltered New York 100s.

The Local. The Burger Truck In The Parking Lot Of Home Depot.

Let me come clean and say I’m guilty of paying whatever the going rate is for the promise of an amazing burger. What’s the going rate these days? $12? $18? $25? OK, fine, if we’re talking about a transcendent beef experience. But I have also learned that an open mind pays culinary dividends in this town, so when I saw the long line of people for the burger truck in the filthy covered parking lot of the Home Depot in Red Hook, my interest was instantly piqued.burger truck, brooklyn, home depot, parking lot, bqeSure, the backdrop is as shitty and gritty as a parking lot can get, but the fact is New Yorkers simply cannot resist a line. It is pure catnip to us. A line implies that there’s something great to be had, and if you’re not in line you are missing out. But eating in the Home Depot parking lot is not something to take lightly so I observed the line for a while. Most of the customers in line seemed to be ordering the same thing: a “cheeseburger with everything.” And when it came to be my turn to give the man in the window my order, I went with the consensus (you saw that coming) and then stepped to the side out of traffic to wait. 5 minutes later, I was handed a large tinfoil wrapped bomb. They have a picnic table set up in the neighboring parking space and as pastoral as that sounds I opted to go eat this thing sitting in my parked car. I never said this was a story about dignity.burger, home depot, burger truck, brooklynIt was delightfully awesome. They toasted the sesame seed bun nicely, and the burger was a handmade patty, juicy and tender with some nice char from the broiler. “With everything” apparently includes fresh shredded lettuce, some dill pickles and old school American cheese slices. They also pre-ketchupped it for me. It was a tasty and satisfying burger, and set me back all of $3.50. What a surprise! I came for the weather stripping, and I left full and happy. I love New York.

About the Author |
We earn our living selling New York City. The next day is never like the last. The last is never ordinary. We witness all sorts. We listen to the City’s noise. We devour its phenomenal food. On the Real is our documentary. It is your pack of unfiltered New York 100s.

The Local. Rocky Sullivan’s.

I really love my apartment, but unlike my pal Greg, I do not have any private outdoor space associated with it.  This isn’t a huge deal November through February, but during the other months it’s something that my wife and I find pretty lamentable. But lucky enough for the terrace-deprived, there are lots of options around town for outdoor fun.  There’s a little known bar on a deserted street in Red Hook named Rocky Sullivan’s that is one of our favorites.
Hidden away on the top of a very dark and cozy Irish pub is one of the best roof decks around!  You’re right near the riverfront so it has a very welcome breeze and if you go on the early side, you basically have the place to yourself.  Grab one of the long wooden tables and kick back with drinks and friends.  And here’s a tip: go on Friday at 6pm.  They have a partnership with Red Hook Lobster Pound and host an old fashioned Lobster Bake with steamed lobsters, fresh summer corn, coleslaw, potato salad, the works!

About the Author |
We earn our living selling New York City. The next day is never like the last. The last is never ordinary. We witness all sorts. We listen to the City’s noise. We devour its phenomenal food. On the Real is our documentary. It is your pack of unfiltered New York 100s.

The Pour.

I’m usually looking out for a delicious, well priced wine to buy and consume in quantities.  I bet you are, too.  Here’s a super solid tip for you: get Red Hook Winery‘s light and summery rose.

I was skeptical (a winery based in Brooklyn?) but it’s backed by the dudes behind the Scholium Project and Robert Foley, and those guys seriously know their grapes.  We’ve been slugging this delicious and easy-drinking rose since May (they sell it at Smith & Vine) and at only $12 a bottle, you can make an every day (I mean, uh, night) treat.

About the Author |
We earn our living selling New York City. The next day is never like the last. The last is never ordinary. We witness all sorts. We listen to the City’s noise. We devour its phenomenal food. On the Real is our documentary. It is your pack of unfiltered New York 100s.

The Local. Red Hook Lobster Pound.

Talk about a craving! For me, lobster rolls are sort of a Less Than Zero experience. I think about them, and then I have to get a fix. Immediately. Good thing the Red Hook Lobster Pound is only about 10 minutes away on the bike. Think of it: fresh-picked Maine lobster, a touch of homemade mayo, a bit of celery and spices on a buttery top-split potato hot dog bun. Drool worthy. For my buck, Red Hook has the best and the freshest version in town. Better than Mary’s Fish Camp, even. I’m not trying to stir up trouble, just speaking truth to power.

You can learn more about the best that Maine has to offer in Brooklyn by clicking here.
About the Author |
We earn our living selling New York City. The next day is never like the last. The last is never ordinary. We witness all sorts. We listen to the City’s noise. We devour its phenomenal food. On the Real is our documentary. It is your pack of unfiltered New York 100s.

Shipping and Handling in Red Hook.

I took a run over to the waterfront this morning in Red Hook and was struck by the massive amount of cargo being moved around at the container terminal. The facility has six active container cranes, 2,080 feet of berthing space, two major bulk-handling yards, and approximately 400,000 square feet of warehouse space. It’s an impressive operation moving at full speed, and on a clear day, pretty colorful too.
About the Author |
We earn our living selling New York City. The next day is never like the last. The last is never ordinary. We witness all sorts. We listen to the City’s noise. We devour its phenomenal food. On the Real is our documentary. It is your pack of unfiltered New York 100s.