The Local. Molly’s.

Long ago when I lived in a ratty little abode on Third Avenue between 18th and 19th Streets, there was a dark, musty and oddly wonderful sanctuary just up the way past 22nd Street. It was the perfect toasty hang out for a tall stout on a bitter snowy night or the perfect meatlocker-esque refuge from a sweltering summer evening for fish and chips and a cold glass of something. I found out yesterday that some things (thankfully) do not change.

Dark mahogany bar, beamed ceiling, sawdust packed floor and all, the folks at Molly’s Shebeen on Third Avenue between 22nd and 23rd make sure the place feel like midnight all day…in the best possible way. It stands at the top of a long list of classic Irish bars/restaurants that must be visited and/or frequented in this town so rich with a long and sorted Gaelic past. A drinking and eating establishment in one form or another since 1895, Molly’s has some of the best Shepherd’s Pie and Fish and Chips around. You also need to give the Corned Beef and Cabbage a shot. But the real winner here is the smooth and creamy perfectly poured pint of Guinness. It was good to see my old friend. I’ll make sure to visit again soon, sweet Molly.

About the Author |
We earn our living selling New York City. The next day is never like the last. The last is never ordinary. We witness all sorts. We listen to the City’s noise. We devour its phenomenal food. On the Real is our documentary. It is your pack of unfiltered New York 100s.

Alexander Hamilton lived here.

Even though he didn’t sign the Declaration of Independence, Alexander Hamilton did do a great deal to shape this great country of ours. And for these good deeds? Hamilton Heights in upper Manhattan was named after him and he got his house made into a national park.

Originally built on his 32 acre estate north of it’s current location, Hamilton Grange has been moved twice since its construction in 1802 and now sits on a bucolic 23 acres in St. Nicholas Park just above Harlem.  It was first moved in 1889 two blocks to the north of where it stands now to Convent Avenue as the city’s grid system moved north. Over the years, adjacent construction and grime took over the manse until finally the National Park Service and The City got together to move it.  Workers had to haul the house on massive dollies south on Convent Avenue, around the corner, and down a steep hill and into the park. An amazing feat indeed!
To bad for The Great Mr. Hamilton that he only got to enjoy his beautiful house for two years.  On the morning of July 11th of 1804 in Weehawken, New Jersey, he was shot by Aaron Burr (the sitting Vice President of the United States) in a duel.  Sadly, he died the next afternoon at 2PM leaving one of the greatest legacies of any American politician.
About the Author |
We earn our living selling New York City. The next day is never like the last. The last is never ordinary. We witness all sorts. We listen to the City’s noise. We devour its phenomenal food. On the Real is our documentary. It is your pack of unfiltered New York 100s.

Great Perspectives. St. Nicholas Avenue & 147th.

About the Author |
We earn our living selling New York City. The next day is never like the last. The last is never ordinary. We witness all sorts. We listen to the City’s noise. We devour its phenomenal food. On the Real is our documentary. It is your pack of unfiltered New York 100s.

Mondays with Lu. Art & music times one hundred.

Rainy mornings are tough when you have a 2.7 year old twerp to entertain and there is no better solution on said mornings than CMA, which we have given a shout out to before.

What we have not given is a well deserved shout out to Annie Moor, who is one of the teaching artistsand the ONLY solution for music time at CMA.  This fine lady from Texas is a rock star to these kids!  The level of enthusiasm and talent is unreal and we are so happy to know this amazing teacher and friend.  Lu cannot wait to see her every single time we go.  Hellos and good-byes are always in the form of big giant hugs.  So fun!

After our medley of tunes and messy fingers, we headed over to Hundred Acres on MacDougal Street for some seriously good Jesus’ Meatballs topped with creamy grits and ricotta.  Great service, great food, and a great conversation with this little mouth full of meatball whose company I was privileged to enjoy.

About the Author |
We earn our living selling New York City. The next day is never like the last. The last is never ordinary. We witness all sorts. We listen to the City’s noise. We devour its phenomenal food. On the Real is our documentary. It is your pack of unfiltered New York 100s.

Date night. To a secret location in the sunset.

We are so privileged to live in a city where we can get a babysitter, call a car, and decide where we’re going on the fly.  Ended up with great oysters, great cocktails, and great friends.  Great night.

About the Author |
We earn our living selling New York City. The next day is never like the last. The last is never ordinary. We witness all sorts. We listen to the City’s noise. We devour its phenomenal food. On the Real is our documentary. It is your pack of unfiltered New York 100s.

It’s a mansion!

I was walking down East 62nd Street this morning and was particularly struck by the contrast between the green leaves on the trees and this fantastic Beaux-Arts mansion that I have passed by so many times before.

Turns out 11 East 62nd Street was bought for $21,000,000 in 1999 by the Government of Japan and is used as the home of its permanent representati  ve to the United Nations.  It was built in 1900 by Margaret Vanderbilt Sheperd for her daughter Edith and her husband Ernesto Fabbri who was head of the Society for Italian Immigrants.  Now known as the Fabbri-Steele Mansion, it stands 45 and a half feet wide with 22,500 square feet under roof!  The architects, Haydel & Shepard, drew plans for massive entertaining spaces including the ornate ballroom, 21 by 45 foot mahogany paneled dining room, seven principle bedrooms, as well as nine staff rooms to house the Swedish chefs, English butler and footmen, Finnish lady’s maid, and Italian valet.  Phew!

The second floor music room boasted this ridiculously ornate electro-pneumatic Aeolian Organ which was installed at a reported cost of $7,500.  Apparently, most everything from the unpainted rolling oak doors in the kitchen to the studded leather door to the dining room was intact when the Japanese government bought the house 13 years ago.  The organ was apparently disassembled and placed in storage where it waits restoration. Check out this 1999 Times article for more history and details and this for a little more on the Aeolian organ.

About the Author |
We earn our living selling New York City. The next day is never like the last. The last is never ordinary. We witness all sorts. We listen to the City’s noise. We devour its phenomenal food. On the Real is our documentary. It is your pack of unfiltered New York 100s.

Fun.

Sunday night was a great night to be a parent.  We took the 9.8 year old to see his first rock concert and favorite band fun.at Terminal 5.  The severe tweaking was formidable, putting it mildly.

Our family is fortunate enough to have these very talented and kind bunch of guys for friends and Jack’s sister and Nate’s better half, sweet amazing Miss Rachel Antonoff, made sure that our Cavan had the full VIP treatment with amazing seats just over the stage.  It was an absolutely incredible vantage point to watch them play what seemed to be every song off the 1st album, Aim and Ignite as well as their smash hit new work of genius, Some Nights.

New York crowds are notoriously tough, but this was one was bananas.  It seemed like every person in the audience knew every word to every song and felt the very strong desire to scream every syllable out at the top of their lungs. Kinda fantastic!  My wife’s throat still hurts!

At the end of the show, we were ushered backstage to a celeb-packed greenroom where we all got to say hello to the guys.  Sir Cavan was was left positively elated watching the aftermath of a gift that his idols…his friends…had just delivered to him in the form of one of the best shows anyone will ever see live.  Thank you, Rachel.  Thank you, boys.  It has been so much fun watching you soar!

About the Author |
We earn our living selling New York City. The next day is never like the last. The last is never ordinary. We witness all sorts. We listen to the City’s noise. We devour its phenomenal food. On the Real is our documentary. It is your pack of unfiltered New York 100s.

Old School. Manhattan Bridge.

If you ride a bike over the East River in between the chosen boroughs, the Manhattan Bridge is a far easier and less treacherous passage than the Brooklyn Bridge where you are pretty much guaranteed to plow into (or nearly do) some unsuspecting camera wielding vacationer from Waxahachi.  Also, you get a great view through the chain link fence of the graffiti on the rooftops of the Lower East Side!

About the Author |
We earn our living selling New York City. The next day is never like the last. The last is never ordinary. We witness all sorts. We listen to the City’s noise. We devour its phenomenal food. On the Real is our documentary. It is your pack of unfiltered New York 100s.

On Gramercy Park. The National Arts Club.

If you have ever had the opportunity to take a stroll around Gramercy Park, you know that is hard to miss the fantastically amazing and ornate National Arts Clubat 15 Gramercy Park South.  I walked past it this morning, and decided it was high time I get in there for a look.

The galleries are open to the public, but I got a sneak peek at the member’s only club.  What an unbelievably cool step back into time!  I felt like I was invited in to sit down with Stanford White for a glass of scotch and a big old Cuban.
The incredible stained glass ceiling by John LaFarge in the West Parlor was of most interest to me.  The Caribbean blue squares juxtaposed with the rich oak framing makes for one of the most visually arresting caps to any room I’ve ever seen.  If you ever have the opportunity to get in there for a look, don’t squander it.  Fantastic late 19th century design.
About the Author |
We earn our living selling New York City. The next day is never like the last. The last is never ordinary. We witness all sorts. We listen to the City’s noise. We devour its phenomenal food. On the Real is our documentary. It is your pack of unfiltered New York 100s.