The Rivers & Streams of Manhattan.

Long ago, Manhattan was a fertile island loaded with wild elk, bears, birds, old growth trees, natural meadows, beautiful rocky cliffs and plenty of ponds, brooks and streams. In his book, Mannahatta: A Natural History of New York City, ecologist Eric Sanderson writes:

If Mannahatta existed today as it did then, it would be a national park. It would be the crowning glory of American national parks.

In the wake of Hurricane Sandy, the rivers and streams that have been long covered by our daily hullaballoo matter again. As flood waters rose, so too did the hidden banks of those all but forgotten bubbling brooks of water, but now into the basements and sub-basements of some of the city’s most expensive and celebrated buildings. You can read about some of that here on Curbed and Scouting New York. But we also thought it would be interesting to include this interactive version of Egvert Viele’s 1865 map of New York City’s grid overlaying the original streams, lakes, rivers and hills of good-old Mannahatta.

Take a minute to zoom in and out, swipe up, down, left and right. My building in the East Village sits on a swamp between a couple of streams that flowed into the East River. Pretty much all of Tribeca west of Church was either a swamp or THE Hudson River. Midtown was a full-on maze of brooks, streams and knolls. What lurks beneath your building? Let us know.

About the Author |
We earn our living selling New York City. The next day is never like the last. The last is never ordinary. We witness all sorts. We listen to the City’s noise. We devour its phenomenal food. On the Real is our documentary. It is your pack of unfiltered New York 100s.

110 Hours After The Flood.

The Battery Park Underpass at noon on November 2nd, 2012. Clearance 12’7″.

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About the Author |
We earn our living selling New York City. The next day is never like the last. The last is never ordinary. We witness all sorts. We listen to the City’s noise. We devour its phenomenal food. On the Real is our documentary. It is your pack of unfiltered New York 100s.

This Was Your Basement.

If you were on East 7th Street Monday as the East River flexed her biceps, you heard the water pouring into each basement. It sounded more like an afternoon hike along a Catskill brook than a natural disaster occurrence in the country’s most populous city.

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This is what it looked like this morning. Banks of garbage bags filled with waterlogged memories, drywall and a free door. Residents of this storied block will renovate and repair, but the contents of these bags will never be replaced.

About the Author |
We earn our living selling New York City. The next day is never like the last. The last is never ordinary. We witness all sorts. We listen to the City’s noise. We devour its phenomenal food. On the Real is our documentary. It is your pack of unfiltered New York 100s.

This Is My Supermarket.

They started pumping the basement out of our Associated Supermarket at about 6PM Tuesday.

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As of 8:30 this morning, there is still about five feet of water in the basement.

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They say it will be about a week before they reopen. This place is essentially our giant walk-in fridge. Can’t wait to have it back.

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About the Author |
We earn our living selling New York City. The next day is never like the last. The last is never ordinary. We witness all sorts. We listen to the City’s noise. We devour its phenomenal food. On the Real is our documentary. It is your pack of unfiltered New York 100s.

Sandy. Sandy.

This was shot from our stoop with my daughter and iPhone in hand as Hurricane Sandy caused the East River to flood most of Avenue C in lower Manhattan. sandy, hurricane sandy, avenue c, east village, manhattan, flood, east 8th street, disaster, greg mchale, jesse shaver, jesse and greg, on the real, new york, new york city nyc, floodUnreal and oddly peaceful…once the sound of the car alarms were finally drowned.

About the Author |
We earn our living selling New York City. The next day is never like the last. The last is never ordinary. We witness all sorts. We listen to the City’s noise. We devour its phenomenal food. On the Real is our documentary. It is your pack of unfiltered New York 100s.