Candlepins.

In Boston, they call it “Candlepins.” In Baltimore, I’m told they call the sport “Duckpins.” If you’re from anywhere else, you probably have no idea what I’m talking about. For lack of a better way to describe it, Candlepin is essentially mini-bowling and although I only learned about it last weekend the game has been around for quite a while.Weird skinny pins. Oversized bocce-style ball. Knock down the pins. Score the results. That’s it, that’s the whole game. But let me tell you, it’s seriously satisfying to whip that sucker down the wooden lane. It’s way more fun than regular bowling, whatever that means. And due to the pint size, it must be sort of like regular bowling for a little kid.We enjoyed playing recently at my nephew’s 6th birthday party, which was held at the vintage-y “Sacco’s Bowl Haven” in Somerville, MA. If you’re up in Boston, I’d say it’s worth a trip to the Somerville ‘burbs just for the Sacco’s experience. In addition to the Candlepins, they also had delicious wood-fired flatbread pizza and a great selection of over 20 local craft beers on tap. Good beer, flat pizza, little pins. What a concept! Got me thinking: a retro Candlepin alley like Sacco’s would do gangbusters business in Brooklyn. Anyone want to help us start one up???

 

About the Author |
We earn our living selling New York City. The next day is never like the last. The last is never ordinary. We witness all sorts. We listen to the City’s noise. We devour its phenomenal food. On the Real is our documentary. It is your pack of unfiltered New York 100s.

On the Read. Live By Night.

I love reading on the subway, and one of the more enjoyable aspects of my subway commute is checking out what my fellow New Yorkers happen to be reading. Admittedly, this was easier in the days before e-readers but I find with some good old fashioned nosiness you can still usually make out what folks are consuming. By employing this well-honed peripheral vision technique, last week I noticed two separate people reading Dennis Lehane’s recently published “Live By Night” and sensing a trend, I picked up a sample. By page 7, I ordered it.It is by turns a period noir, a mob thriller and an epic, though what I ultimately found it to be was compelling. I enjoy literature that is not easily digested and although by no means a shallow read, Live By Night is not deep. Where it succeeds, however, is in the rare art of being a terrific page-turner and it’s completely entertaining. The plot is tight, with well-rendered characters and sharp, believable dialogue. This novel cries out “I’m a movie!” like nothing I’ve read in recent memory (save for The Sisters Brothers, and I think that has been optioned already.) So, pick it up. Lehane is a good writer. Be entertained!

About the Author |
We earn our living selling New York City. The next day is never like the last. The last is never ordinary. We witness all sorts. We listen to the City’s noise. We devour its phenomenal food. On the Real is our documentary. It is your pack of unfiltered New York 100s.